How Exercise Can Help Relieve Arthritis Pain

If you have arthritis then you know just how agonizing it can be when you’re in pain. And exercising is probably the last thing on your mind. But, did you know that with regular exercise you can actually improve your arthritis pain?

At Orthopedic Associates Of Southwest Florida, Edward R. Dupay, Jr., DO and our team are dedicated to your whole body health. That’s why we’ve compiled this helpful guide to how exercise can help you alleviate arthritis pain. 

How exercise helps you

Arthritis is a condition where your body attacks your joints and cartilage. It leads to painful inflammation and joint stiffness. The cause of your arthritis varies depending on the kind of arthritis that you have, of which there are about 100 different types.

Regardless of the kind of arthritis that you have, exercise can be quite helpful. Here are the different ways in which it can benefit your health:

It strengthens the muscles around your joints 

Unfortunately when you have arthritis, it feels like the last thing that you want to do is get moving. However, when you exercise you strengthen your muscles, and though you may feel pain at first, you’re not actually harming your joints. 

By strengthening your muscles you’re providing more support for your joints and your body overall. And this means less pressure on your joints. 

It improves your flexibility 

When you don’t move, you’re actually stiffening your joints and making your arthritis worse. Your joints need some impact to stay healthy. So, when you stay sedentary you also impact your range of motion as stiff joints can make it difficult for you to move.  

Exercising tips for those with arthritis

Because you have arthritis, you’ll want to take a few precautions. First, before you start working out, be sure to stretch out. This helps to relieve pressure on your joints and to promote flexibility so that your workout is easier. Some of our patients find it helpful to try a yoga routine before their workout. 

When working out, remember to go at your own pace and to do only what feels comfortable to you. If you’re looking for a low impact workout, swimming is an excellent workout for both arthritis and pain relief. 

Finally, remember to be kind to yourself. Going harder isn’t necessarily better. Working out at your own pace and in a way that’s both fun and comfortable to you can be incredibly beneficial to limiting your arthritis pain.

We can provide you with more information on what workout is best for your unique needs. To learn more about how you can stay active with arthritis, call us or make an appointment today.

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